2500 Years of Noir

 OR

Oedipe roi, adapted by Didier Lamaison, Série noire, 2355,  Gallimard, 2004
 

The Classical Tragedy is the matrix of the noir novel. Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex is the mother (!) of all tragedies. Gallimard’s Série Noire is the most iconic of the series devoted to the noir genre. It thus seemed almost unavoidable that the Série Noire would publish a novelisation of Œdipe roi as a roman noir.  Not only is it the story of an investigation centred on a crime, and on an enigma, but the tragic plot of the devastating fall of a flawed hero, at the hands of both a malevolent fate and his blind ambition, has profound echoes in the noir genre. From his arrival in a city plagued by fear and division (like in Hammett’s “Poisonville”) to his social elevation, followed by the discovery that he is himself the culprit, to the intertwined dimensions of the collective (public unrest, civic duties, public office) and the private (anxieties, name, secret, genealogy, sex) such echoes abound. In all these situations (and to say nothing in particular about the role of transgression, violence, horror and mutilation) tragedy is revealed as a classic form of noir, just as noir appears as a modern expression of tragedy.

What might, however, sound  slightly more surprising is that this novelisation, “adapted from the myth” has become, 25 centuries after the original creation, one of the best-sellers in the Série Noire. It has had various re-editions. One of them was published together with a new traduction of the original tragedy.

Pasolini

Franco Citti, in Edipo Re, Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1967 (Poster )

oedipe_roi

Oedipe roi , adapted by Didier Lamaison, Série noire, 2355,  Gallimard, 1994, 157 pages.

Lamaison SN

 

 

LSOR

Didier Lamaison,  Sophocle, Œdipe roi (novel) followed by Œdipe roi (tragedy), Folio policier (n° 401), Gallimard, 2006

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