Author: International Crime Fiction Research Group

About International Crime Fiction Research Group

The International CrimeFiction research group, based at @QUB_Humanities, connects scholars working on popular fiction, popular culture and digital humanities.

Online exhibition: A History of Crime Fiction in Greece

greek-holmes

The International Crime Fiction Research Group is glad to present a new online exhibition hosted on the Omeka-based online database “Visualising Crime Fiction,” sponsored by the AHRC  (the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council) and the Universities of Belfast, Limoges, and Debrecen, in partnership with the Bilipo. A Brief History of Crime Fiction in Greece was authored by Nikos Filippaios, currently a PhD student at the University of Ioannina, and provides a concise outline of the development of the genre in Greece, with particular attention to the impact of international crime fiction on the local creative industries.

Filippaios starts his overview by stressing the success of the earliest translations of modern popular fiction that arrived from Western Europe in the second half of the 19th century. He then highlights the key transformations of crime narratives in Greece throughout the 20th century, particularly up to the 1980’s, when a new generation of local writers started to use the genre to investigate the troubled national history during the post-war era.

The exhibition is structured in four sections, each dealing with a specific historical moment: Continue reading

Advertisements

No Alibis : An Interview with David Torrans

No Alibis

 

 by Annika Breinig (with thanks to Portia Ellis-Woods and Dominique Jeannerod)

 55536_1_no-alibis-bookstore

No Alibis : a  Bookshop to die for (83, Botanic Avenue, Belfast, BTL7 1 JL) Continue reading

Crime Fiction In Catalan: 2 From the Civil War until Today

Cua

 By Dr Stewart King, Monash University

The development of crime fiction in Catalan from the Civil War until today has been shaped by two major historic events: the Franco regime (1939-1975) and the reestablishment of parliamentary democracy following the dictator’s death in 1975. After the war a series of laws were enacted prohibiting the public use and teaching of Catalan and, during the early 1940s, the publication of books in Catalan. Indeed, in scenes reminiscent of Nazi Germany, books were thrown onto bonfires or pulped. However, from the mid-1940s the regime began to relax some of the restrictions on the use of Catalan, and books started to appear, some in clandestine editions. The effect of such policies on Catalan culture and identity cannot be underestimated. By 1975 only approximately 50 percent of the population could speak Catalan and even fewer could read it. In contrast, the return of democracy has seen the recovery and consolidation of Catalan as a language of communication and cultural production.

Francoist cultural policies shaped in many ways the sort of literature Catalans wrote, as many authors saw it as their duty to defend Catalan as a language of prestige by producing works of high culture. Others, nevertheless, felt that Catalan literature should cater for more diverse tastes by providing books, like crime novels, that catered to the tastes of a readership beyond the well-educated middle class. Of the latter writers, Rafael Tasis and Manuel de Pedrolo stand out.

Selecta

Tasis was the first Catalan to write crime fiction after the war, publishing a trilogy of novels set in pre-war Barcelona: La Bíblia valenciana [The Valencian Bible] (1955), És hora de plegar [Quitting Time] (1956) and Un Crim al Paralelo [Crime on Paralelo Avenue] (1960), although the latter was actually written in Paris in 1944 where Tasis resided in exile until 1948 Continue reading

Exhibition: Cinéma premiers crimes (Paris, 17.4-2.8)

viewmultimediadocument

The wonderful exhibition Cinema’s First Crimes curated by Matthieu Letourneux (Paris X), Alain Carou (BNF) and Catherine Cauchard (BILIPO) opens tomorrow in Paris at the Galerie des Bibliothèques.

The “Visualising European Crime Fiction” project collaborated with its organisers to create a promotional website to be found at the following address:

http://cinema-premiers-crimes.fr/indexEN.html

Here below an excerpt from the press kit:

Cinemas premiers crimes enables today’s audiences to feel the same shivers that rippled through spectators a hundred years ago.

Continue reading

London calling: Forensics, European crime fiction…and cake

Mrs. Peabody Investigates

I’m just back from a couple of crime-filled days in London. The main reason for my visit was to speak at a symposium on European crime fiction and data visualisation (of which more later), but I travelled up a day early in order to see the Forensics exhibition at The Wellcome Trust.

16498201563_555d7a914b_z The Wellcome Trust is by Euston Square station. Get there early, as it’s a popular exhibition

I’ve already written about the Forensics exhibition in a previous post, so here’s a summary of the parts I particularly liked.

  • Its focus, as one would expect, is scientific, but it also incorporates photography and artwork reflecting on violence, murder and its aftermath, which provide some genuinely thought-provoking perspectives.
  • Frances Glessner Lee’s ‘Nutshell Study of Unexplained Death’ – a crime scene recreated in a dollhouse for police training purposes in the 1940s – was fascinating for its miniature juxtaposition of detailed handcrafts and…

View original post 713 more words

CFP:Postcolonial and Transnational Crime Fiction

CRIME FICTION HERE AND THERE

Call for Papers

The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies (published by Routledge from 2016)

Special Issue – Postcolonial and Transnational Crime Fiction

Since the nineteenth century crime fiction has provided a space for authors to comment on colonial relations, the iniquities of colonialism, and the aberrations of colonial systems of law enforcement and justice.  The complex legacy of colonialism in contemporary times continues to be explored in transnational crime fiction.  This special issue aims to showcase the latest scholarship on postcolonial and transnational crime fiction in which the following questions are raised and answered:

  • How has the genre of crime fiction, and its many sub-genres, been adapted, transformed, re-imagined and subverted by postcolonial and transnational crime fiction texts?
  • How does postcolonial and transnational crime fiction investigate colonial and neo-colonial power dynamics, structures of authority, notions of justice and law enforcement?
  • What specific cultural and socio-political contexts are examined in…

View original post 309 more words

The 2015 Petrona Award shortlist is revealed!

Mrs. Peabody Investigates

Six high-quality crime novels from Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden have made the shortlist of the 2015 Petrona Award for the Best Scandinavian Crime Novel of the Year, which is announced today.

  • THE HUMMINGBIRD by Kati Hiekkapelto tr. David Hackston                         (Arcadia Books; Finland)
  • THE HUNTING DOGS by Jørn Lier Horst tr. Anne Bruce                              (Sandstone Press; Norway)
  • REYKJAVIK NIGHTS by Arnaldur Indriðason tr. Victoria Cribb                        (Harvill Secker; Iceland)
  • THE HUMAN FLIES by Hans Olav Lahlum tr. Kari Dickson                               (Mantle; Norway)
  • FALLING FREELY, AS IF IN A DREAM by Leif G W Persson tr. Paul Norlen (Doubleday; Sweden)
  • THE SILENCE…

View original post 736 more words