Events

The Mysteries of Bucharest

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Today in Bucharest is the opening  of the Mysteries of Bucharest  Festival (Misterele Bucureștiului, June 7 to 9, 2019). This Festival, which is part of the  2019 Romania – France season (Sezonului România – Franța 2019), is organised for the first time this year. It is a partnership between the National Museum of Romanian Literature,  the Quais du Polar Festival (Lyons), the French Institute of Romania and the Theater of Romanian Playwrights. Its title pays homage to  Ioan M. Bujoreanu’s pioneering (and sole) novel Mistere din Bucureşti, published in two volumes (1862 and 1864), which is generally considered as the first crime fiction novel written in Romanian. Bujoreanu himself was paying homage to  the seminal Mysteries of Paris, by Eugène Sue (Les Mystères de Paris), which had appeared as a 90 installments serial in Le Journal des Débats, between June 1842 and October 1843.

Eugène Sue’s success abroad offered a blueprint for the circulation of crime novels (lato sensu) in Europe from the middle of the 19th century. Sue’s Model circulated in fact twice. It was indeed disseminated both through numerous translations of his novel, Les Mystères de Paris, which proliferated throughout Europe, and through the imitation and adaptation of the narrative frame of Urban Mysteries to other European Capital Cities.  Los Misteríos de Madrid (Juan Martínez Villergas,1844), The Mysteries of London (G. W. H. Reynolds, 1844-1848), Les Mystères de Bruxelles (Édouard Suau de Varennes, 1844-1846), Die Geheimnisse von Berlin (N.N., 1844) followed in quick succession, setting a European trend (I Misteri di Roma Contemporanea  (B. Del Vecchio, 1851-53);   Os Mistérios de Lisboa (Camilo Castelo Branco, 1854), which would also disseminate elsewhere. The phenomenon exported to America too, of course, with notably The Mysteries and Miseries of New York (Ned Buntline, 1848)[1]

The Mysteries of Bucharest festival highlights the interconnection between European Popular Cultures. It shows how Crime Fiction speak to Europeans of different languages, cultures, religions and origins. It thus contributes to a better knowledge of cultural Europeanisation and to a  renewal of cultural narratives of Europe, beyond national borders, as promoted by the Horizon 2020 Call ” Understanding Europe – Promoting the European public and cultural space”  (H2020-SC6-CULT-COOP-2016-2017).   It will also give an opportunity to showcase research carried out in the H 2020 funded  DETECt project – Detecting Transcultural Identity in European Popular Crime Narratives –  which links Today’s crime fiction culture with European cultural heritage.

The full programme  of the festival is here 

[1]  For more details and examples (in French) see : Les Mystères urbains, directed by  Filippos Katsanos, Marie-Ève Thérenty & Helle Waahlberg: http://www.medias19.org/index.php?id=630 and Matthieu Letourneux, “Les ” mystères urbains ”, expression d’une modernité énigmatique.” Alla ricerca delle radici popolari della cultura europea, Looking for the Roots of European Popular Culture, Dec 2009, Bologne, Italie. ffhal-00645212 https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00645212/document

 

 

 

 

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NOIReland 2019

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NOIRELAND

8-10 March 2019

Europa Hotel, Belfast

For full programme details visit: http://www.noireland.com

Some of the highlights include bestselling crime novelist Ann Cleeves, the creator of Vera and Shetland television series. Belinda Bauer whose bestselling Snap was nominated for the 2017 Booker Prize. Number one bestseller Stuart MacBride; the multi award-winning Denise Mina; Belfast’s own CWA Gold Dagger winner Steve Cavanagh and the team from RTE television’s hit series Love/Hate and Taken Down.

“Very close to the bone”

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Northern Heist

– Richard O’Rawe –

Book Launch

September 28 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

No Alibis Bookstore, 82, Botanic Avenue, Belfast

FREE

In association with The Merrion Press, No Alibis Bookstore invites you to the launch of this stunning new thriller by Richard O’Rawe

When James ‘Ructions’ O’Hare put together a crack team to rob the National Bank in Belfast in December 2004, even he didn’t realise he was about to carry off one of the biggest bank heists in British and Irish history.

And he’ll be damned if the Provos are getting a slice of it.

In Richard O’Rawe’s stunning debut novel, as audacious and well executed as Ructions’ plan to rob the National Bank itself, a new voice in Irish fiction has been unleashed that will shock, surprise and thrill as he takes you on a white-knuckle ride through Belfast’s criminal underbelly. Enter the deadly world of tiger kidnappings, kangaroo courts, money laundering, drug deals and double-crosses.

Northern Heist is a roller-coaster bank robbery thriller with twists and turns from beginning to end.

Source: No Alibis : http://noalibis.com/event/northern-heist-richard-orawe-book-launch/
Richard O’Rawe is a former Irish republican prisoner and IRA bank robber, and was a leading figure in the 1981 Hunger Strike. He is the author of the best-selling non-fiction books Blanketmen: An Untold Story of the H-Block Hunger Strike; Afterlives: The Hunger Strike and the Secret Offer that Changed Irish History, and In the Name of the Son: The Gerry Conlon Story (source : googlebooks)

 

A visit to the morgue

By Loïc Artiaga (translation Daniel Magennis)

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Caption: [Postcard ‘Visite de Mimi à Paris’ (‘Mimi’s trip to Paris’), G. Gervais – editor]

The  ‘Forensics’ exhibition, which  has been showing in London in the Wellcome Library since February, is closing tomorrow. It presents what was one of the most popular attractions of the Belle Époque in Paris: the visit to the morgue. One hundred years ago, corpses which had been put on display in order to aid in their identification found themselves surrounded by curious onlookers seeking to satisfy macabre appetites. The current exhibition documents this historical attraction to the morbid. Its principal goal, however, lies elsewhere. It aims to show the progress of the understanding of death and, entering the modern era, the science applied to the process of solving crimes. A wealth of new knowledge, fed by the illusion that rationality could triumph over the basest of criminals and crimes, would be applied to the corpses laid out on mortuary slabs and, before long, would also be arrayed against what, or whom, put them there. Continue reading

A Festival of Crime Fiction Writers at the ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast

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The conference on Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture (ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast, 15-16 June 2015)  hosts acclaimed Crime Fiction authors Andrew Pepper, Anthony Quinn, Brian McGilloway, Gerard Brennan, Leigh Redhead, and Rob Kitchin. Please find here  the full  Programme

Kitchin Continue reading

Doing justice to the Irish border landscape: An interview with Anthony Quinn

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[Dominique Jeannerod]  Many thanks for accepting to answer some questions, ahead of next week’s Belfast Conference on Representations of the Rural in Crime Fiction.  We are really looking forward to it . You will be in No Alibis on Monday, to talk about your writing, together with Brian McGilloway and Andrew Pepper.  

 To begin with, in which literary tradition would you consider yourself belonging?

[Anthony Quinn] Although I write crime fiction I aspire, perhaps a little grandiosely, to writing within an older Irish tradition, a peasant literature that is about a fugitive, almost magical sense of place and belonging, and the crimes that are committed by dislocated people and societies, the same tradition say as JB Keane’s The Field, or the poetry of Patrick Kavanagh.

Is there something like a rural school within Irish Noir? Continue reading

Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture

 

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Whit Harrison (Harry Whittington), “Swamp Kill”, Phantom Books 508, 1952

“Setting the Scene”: Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture, ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast 15-16 June 2015
Keynotes :

Professor Benoit Tadié (University of Rennes) “Desperadoes and Backwoods Teasers: the Resilience of Rural Noir in Postwar America

Professor Paul Cloke (University of Exeter)  “Imaginative Geographies and the Production of Rural Space”

Professor Rob Kitchin (NUIM), ‘Place, Landscape and Rurality in Crime Fiction’

Invited Authors:

Brian McGilloway & Anthony Quinn, interviewed by Andrew Pepper : ‘Rurality and rural landscapes in Irish Crime Fiction’,  Monday 15th, 6: 30, No Alibis Bookstore, on Botanic Avenue
The full programme for our conference is now live, and can be accessed at:

 http://www.qub.ac.uk/research-centres/InstituteforCollaborativeResearchintheHumanities/Filestore/Filetoupload,508569,en.pdf

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