Irish Crime Fiction

Northern Ireland: More than rain. An interview with Adrian McKinty

By Daniel Magennis. PhD Student. Queen’s University Belfast.
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Adrian McKinty’s Sean Duffy series.

I meet Adrian McKinty in the Piano bar in Belfast’s Europa Hotel – the self-proclaimed ‘most bombed hotel in Europe’ – to discuss his multi award-winning Sean Duffy series, the Northern Irish identity and growing up in Carrick during the darker years of Northern Ireland’s short but turbulent history. Continue reading

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Still Silver’s city? Maurice Leitch’s 1981 prize-winning novel re-released.

A review by Daniel Magennis. PhD candidate at Queen’s University Belfast.

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Front cover of the May 2017 reissue of ‘Silver’s City’ by Turnpike Books.

A German once said the Irish always reminded him of a pack of hounds pulling down a stag, but, Nan, we only drag down our own kind. Or try to. (107-8)[1] Continue reading

Niamh O’Connor’s Seven rules for writing captivating Crime Fiction

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Bestselling author and former Sunday World  crime reporter Niamh O’Connor gave today a fascinating invited reading as part of the University of Limerick Consuming Crime conference, organised  by Dr Marieke Krajenbrink and Dr Kate Quinn.

She has written a number of True Crime books, amongst them, I’m sorry Sir, a recent investigation on “Ireland’s BDSM killer”.

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Here are the seven rules, which she gave as advice on how to write Irish Crime fiction stories with traction. Continue reading

A Festival of Crime Fiction Writers at the ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast

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The conference on Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture (ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast, 15-16 June 2015)  hosts acclaimed Crime Fiction authors Andrew Pepper, Anthony Quinn, Brian McGilloway, Gerard Brennan, Leigh Redhead, and Rob Kitchin. Please find here  the full  Programme

Kitchin Continue reading

Rurality and rural landscapes in Irish Crime Fiction

 

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Belfast, Monday 15th June, 6: 15  p.m. No Alibis Bookstore,

As part of the conference  on the Rural as a scene in Crime Fiction (conference organised  by the Institute for collaborative Research in the Humanities at Queen’s University, Belfast),  Brian McGilloway & Anthony Quinn will talk about their work in No Alibis Bookstore, in  conversation with author Dr Andrew Pepper. All welcome ! Come and join us !

If you are interested in attending the conference on Interdisciplinary Approaches to ‘Setting the Scene’: Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture, ICRH, Queen’s University,

Belfast 15-16 June 2015

Please contact :  Dr Dominique Jeannerod  (d.jeannerod@qub.ac.uk)  or  Dr Linda Price (l.price@qub.ac.uk)

No Alibis : An Interview with David Torrans

No Alibis

 

 by Annika Breinig (with thanks to Portia Ellis-Woods and Dominique Jeannerod)

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No Alibis : a  Bookshop to die for (83, Botanic Avenue, Belfast, BTL7 1 JL) Continue reading

Troubles Thrillers, made in France

shannon(With thanks to François Rivière)

The  “Troubles Thriller” is an international genre. Albeit  peripheral,  and taking place in a small country,  the conflict in Northern Ireland has generated a flurry of crime novels set there during the Troubles.  In addition to the several hundreds Crime and spy novels written in Britain and in America on the ” Troubles” in Northern Ireland, there have been a number of novels written on this subject by European Crime authors and published in their own countries. These works have very rarely been translated into English (nor, as a rule in many other languages), as they primarily targeted their  own domestic market, and sought to offer there a similar fare to the Tom Clancy, Jack Higgins and others who dominated the genre. They might be derivative, but this in itself does not make them redundant.  Their take on the conflict is often highly idiosyncratic. They are controversial, but they were read by hundred thousands, if not by millions of readers.   The political views they display and the representations of Ireland which they carry are of interest, making the books  precious sources  for a cultural history  of European responses to the situation in  Ireland. Continue reading