Anthony Quinn

International Crime Genre Research Group 7th biennial conference (Galway)

Trespass Continue reading

Advertisements

A Festival of Crime Fiction Writers at the ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast

devlin

The conference on Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture (ICRH, Queen’s University, Belfast, 15-16 June 2015)  hosts acclaimed Crime Fiction authors Andrew Pepper, Anthony Quinn, Brian McGilloway, Gerard Brennan, Leigh Redhead, and Rob Kitchin. Please find here  the full  Programme

Kitchin Continue reading

Rurality and rural landscapes in Irish Crime Fiction

 

McGilloway

Belfast, Monday 15th June, 6: 15  p.m. No Alibis Bookstore,

As part of the conference  on the Rural as a scene in Crime Fiction (conference organised  by the Institute for collaborative Research in the Humanities at Queen’s University, Belfast),  Brian McGilloway & Anthony Quinn will talk about their work in No Alibis Bookstore, in  conversation with author Dr Andrew Pepper. All welcome ! Come and join us !

If you are interested in attending the conference on Interdisciplinary Approaches to ‘Setting the Scene’: Representations of Rurality in Crime Fiction and Media Culture, ICRH, Queen’s University,

Belfast 15-16 June 2015

Please contact :  Dr Dominique Jeannerod  (d.jeannerod@qub.ac.uk)  or  Dr Linda Price (l.price@qub.ac.uk)

Doing justice to the Irish border landscape: An interview with Anthony Quinn

Lough neagh


Hello, Anthony Quinn.  Welcome here.  Many thanks for accepting to answer some questions, ahead of next week’s Belfast Conference on Representations of the Rural in Crime Fiction.  We are really looking forward to it . You will be in No Alibis on Monday, to talk about your writing, together with Brian McGilloway and Andrew Pepper.  

 To begin with, in which literary tradition would you consider yourself belonging?

Although I write crime fiction I aspire, perhaps a little grandiosely, to writing within an older Irish tradition, a peasant literature that is about a fugitive, almost magical sense of place and belonging, and the crimes that are committed by dislocated people and societies, the same tradition say as JB Keane’s The Field, or the poetry of Patrick Kavanagh.

Is there something like a rural school within Irish Noir? Continue reading